Key topics in landscape ecology (Cambridge, 2007). - ОГЛАВЛЕНИЕ / CONTENTS
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ОбложкаKey topics in landscape ecology / ed. by J.Wu, R.J.Hobbs. - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007. - xv, 297 p.: ill., 1 map. - (Cambridge studies in landscape ecology). - Incl. bibl. ref. - Ind.: p.288-297. - ISBN 0-521-61644-1
 

Оглавление / Contents
 
   List of contributors ......................................... x
   Preface ................................................... xiii

Part I Introduction
1  Perspectives and prospects of landscape ecology .............. 3
   RICHARD HOBBS AND JIANGUO WU
   1.1  Introduction ............................................ 3
   1.2  Key issues and research topics in landscape ecology ..... 4
   1.3  Concluding remarks ...................................... 8
   References ................................................... 8
   
Part II Key topics and perspectives
2  Adequate data of known accuracy are critical to advancing
   the field of landscape ecology .............................. 11
   LOUIS R. IVERSON
   2.1  Introduction ........................................... 11
   2.2  Data advances in past two decades ...................... 11
   2.3  Current status ......................................... 13
   2.4  What we will have soon ................................. 16
   2.5  Issues of data quality ................................. 16
   2.6  Needs in data acquisition and quality .................. 21
   2.7  Policy issues related to data acquisition and
        quality ................................................ 31
   2.8  Conclusions ............................................ 31
   References .................................................. 31

3  Landscape pattern analysis: key issues and challenges ....... 39
   HARBIN LI AND JIANGUO WU
   3.1  Introduction ........................................... 39
   3.2  General classification of LPA methods .................. 40
   3.1  Key components of spatial pattern in relation to LPA ... 41
   3.4  Statistical and ecological assumptions of LPA 
        methods ................................................ 44
   3.5  Behavior of LPA methods ................................ 49
   3.6  Limitations and challenges of LPA ...................... 52
   3.7  Concluding remarks ..................................... 57
   Acknowledgments ............................................. 59
   References .................................................. 59

4  Spatial heterogeneity and ecosystem processes ............... 62
   MONICA G. TURNER AND JEFFREY A. CARDILLE
   4.1  Introduction ........................................... 62
   4.2  Understanding the spatial heterogeneity of process
        rates .................................................. 63
   4.3  Influence of land-use legacies ......................... 65
   4.4  Lateral fluxes in landscape mosaics .................... 68
   4.5  Linking species and ecosystems ......................... 70
   4.6  Concluding comments .................................... 71
   Acknowledgments ............................................. 72
   References .................................................. 73

5  Landscape heterogeneity and metapopulation dynamics ......... 78
   LENORE FAHRIG
   5.1  Introduction ........................................... 78
   5.2  Levins' metapopulation model ........................... 78
   5.3  Spatially realistic metapopulation models .............. 80
   5.4  PVA tools based on the metapopulation framework ........ 82
   5.5  Landscape population models ............................ 83
   5.6  Conclusions ............................................ 89
   Acknowledgments ............................................. 89
   References .................................................. 89

6  Determining pattern-process relationships in
   heterogeneous landscapes .................................... 92
   ROBERT H. GARDNER, JAMES D. FORESTER, AND ROY E. PLOTNICK
   6.1  Introduction ........................................... 92
   6.2  Methods ................................................ 93
   6.3  Results ............................................... 100
   6.4  Conclusions and recommendations ....................... 107
   Acknowledgments ............................................ 111
   References ................................................. 111

7  Scale and scaling: a cross-disciplinary perspective ........ 115
   JIANGUO WU
   7.1  Introduction .......................................... 115
   7.2  Concepts of scale and scaling ......................... 116
   7.3  Scale effects, MAUP, and "ecological fallacy" ......... 119
   7.4  Theory and methods of scaling ......................... 124
   7.5  Discussion and conclusions ............................ 134
   Acknowledgments ............................................ 136
   References ................................................. 136

8  Optimization of landscape pattern .......................... 143
   JOHN HOF AND CURTIS FLATHER
   8.1  Introduction .......................................... 143
   8.2  State-of-the-science in spatial optimization .......... 144
   8.3  Critical research questions ........................... 151
   8.4  Conclusion ............................................ 157
   References ................................................. 158

9  Advances in detecting landscape changes at multiple 
   scales: examples from northern Australia ................... 161
   JOHN A. LUDWIG
   9.1  Introduction .......................................... 161
   9.2  Examples of detecting landscape changes from northern
        Australia ............................................. 162
   9.3  Key challenges ........................................ 164
   9.4  Summary ............................................... 169
   Acknowledgments ............................................ 170
   References ................................................. 170

10 The preoccupation of landscape research with land use and
   land cover ................................................. 173
   MARC ANTROP
   10.1 Introduction .......................................... 173
   10.2 Method ................................................ 175
   10.3 Results ............................................... 176
   10.4 Discussion ............................................ 184
   10.5 Conclusions: key issues for further integration in
        landscape ecology ..................................... 188
   References ................................................. 189

11 Applying landscape-ecological principles to regional
   conservation: the Wild Country Project in Australia ........ 192
   BRENDAN G. MACKEY, MICHAEL E. SOULÉ, HENRY A. NIX, HARRY
   F. RECHER, ROBERT G. LESSLIE, JANN E. WILLIAMS, JOHN C.Z.
   WOINARSKI, RICHARD J. HOBBS, AND HUGH P. POSSINGHAM
   11.1 Introduction .......................................... 192
   11.2 Foundation principles ................................. 195
   11.3 Large-scale connectivity .............................. 199
   11.4 Research and development issues ....................... 202
   11.5 Conclusion ............................................ 207
   Acknowledgments ............................................ 208
   References ................................................. 208

12 Using landscape ecology to make sense of Australia's last
   frontier ................................................... 214
   DAVID BOWMAN
   12.1 Introduction .......................................... 214
   12.2 The north Australian frontier ......................... 215
   12.3 This is not a landscape ............................... 217
   12.4 The quadrat is dead ................................... 217
   12.5 Landscape models: but "there is no there there" ....... 218
   12.6 Longing and belonging ................................. 219
   12.7 Tell me a story ....................................... 220
   12.8 Unexpected insights: confessions of an empiricist ..... 222
   12.9 Conclusion ............................................ 223
   Acknowledgments ............................................ 224
   References ................................................. 224

13 Transferring ecological knowledge to landscape planning:
   a design method for robust corridors ....................... 227
   CLAIRE C. VOS, PAUL OPDAM, EVELIENE G. STEINGRÖVER, AND 
   RIEN REIJNEN
   13.1 Introduction .......................................... 227
   13.2 Context of the case study ............................. 229
   13.3 The development of robust corridors and the 
        implementation in the planning process ................ 232
   13.4 Discussion ............................................ 239
   References ................................................. 243

14 Integrative landscape research: facts and challenges ....... 246
   GARY FRY, BÄRBEL TRESS, AND GUNTHER TRESS
   14.1 Introduction .......................................... 246
   14.2 Methods ............................................... 247
   14.3 Defining integrative research approaches .............. 247
   14.4 Motivations for integrative landscape studies ......... 250
   14.5 What are we trying to integrate? ...................... 253
   14.6 Organizational barriers to integration ................ 254
   14.7 Education and training needs .......................... 256
   14.8 Improving the theory base ............................. 257
   14.9 The merit system and the products of integrative
        research .............................................. 257
   14.10 Mapping the boundaries of research ................... 261
   14.11 Enhancing integrative landscape ecology research ..... 263
   14.12 Conclusion ........................................... 265
   References ................................................. 266

Part III Synthesis
15 Landscape ecology: the state-of-the-science ................ 271
   JIANGUO WU AND RICHARD J. HOBBS
   15.1 Introduction .......................................... 271
   15.2 Two dominant approaches to landscape ecology .......... 274
   15.3 The elusive goal of a unified landscape ecology ....... 277
   15.4 A hierarchical and pluralistic framework for 
        landscape ecology ..................................... 279
   15.5 Discussion and conclusions ............................ 284
   Acknowledgments ............................................ 285
   References ................................................. 285
   
   Index ...................................................... 288


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